Thursday, 18 August 2016

Gorgeous fonts collection for the web (original from OS)

I have gathered together a nice resource list of stunning web safe fonts that you can use with CSS stylesheets. “Web Safe” fonts mean that they will be extremely common on most versions of Windows, Mac, Linux etc, so they will be viewable by more or less everyone. Along with each font is a preview image of what it looks like, and the raw CSS code that you can copy and paste directly into your own stylesheet to use the font. If you have any others please drop in a comment.


Franklin Gothic Light


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: 'Franklin Gothic Light', 'Franklin Gothic Medium';
}[/css]
* * * * *

Impact


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Impact, Charcoal, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Palatino Linotype


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Palatino Linotype’, ‘Book Antiqua’, Palatino, serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Tahoma


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Tahoma, Geneva, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Century Gothic


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Century Gothic, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Lucida Sans Unicode


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Lucida Sans Unicode’, ‘Lucida Grande’, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Arial Black


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Arial Black’, Gadget, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Times New Roman


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Times New Roman’, Times, serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Arial Narrow


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Arial Narrow’, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Verdana


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Copperplate Gothic Light


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Copperplate / Copperplate Gothic Light, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Lucida Console


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Lucida Console’, Monaco, monospace;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Gill Sans – as much as I WISH this was web safe, it is not!


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Gill Sans / Gill Sans MT, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Trebuchet MS


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, Helvetica, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Courier New


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: ‘Courier New’, Courier, monospace;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Arial


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
}[/css]
* * * * *

Georgia


[css].classname {
color: #333333;
font-family: Georgia, Serif;
}[/css]
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Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Create Database + Table and Insert Data Into MySQL

How do I create a MySQL database, tables, and insert (store) data into newly created tables?


MySQL is a free and open source database management system. You need to use sql commands to create database. You also need to login as mysql root user account. To create a database and set up tables for the same use the following sql commands:
1. CREATE DATABASE – create the database. To use this statement, you need the CREATE privilege for the database.
2. CREATE TABLE – create the table. You must have the CREATE privilege for the table.
3. INSERT – To add/insert data to table i.e. inserts new rows into an existing table.

Procedure for creating a database and a sample table
Login as the mysql root user to create database:
$ mysql -u root -p
Sample outputs:
mysql>

Add a database called books, enter:
mysql> CREATE DATABASE books;
Now, database is created. Use a database with use command, type:
mysql> USE books;
Next, create a table called authors with name, email and id as fields:
mysql> CREATE TABLE authors (id INT, name VARCHAR(20), email VARCHAR(20));
To display your tables in books database, enter:
mysql> SHOW TABLES;
Sample outputs:
+-----------------+
| Tables_in_books |
+-----------------+
| authors         |
+-----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Finally, add a data i.e. row to table books using INSERT statement, run:
mysql> INSERT INTO authors (id,name,email) VALUES(1,"Vivek","xuz@abc.com");
Sample outputs:
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

Try to add few more rows to your table:
mysql> INSERT INTO authors (id,name,email) VALUES(2,"Priya","p@gmail.com");
mysql> INSERT INTO authors (id,name,email) VALUES(3,"Tom","tom@yahoo.com");
To display all rows i.e. data stored in authors table, enter:
mysql> SELECT * FROM authors;
Sample outputs:
+------+-------+---------------+
| id   | name  | email         |
+------+-------+---------------+
|    1 | Vivek | xuz@abc.com   |
|    2 | Priya | p@gmail.com   |
|    3 | Tom   | tom@yahoo.com |
+------+-------+---------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Now, you know how to create a database and a table. For further information please see MySQL data types and official documentation.
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Saturday, 5 March 2016

What can PHP do?


Anything. PHP is mainly focused on server-side scripting, so you can do anything any other CGI program can do, such as collect form data, generate dynamic page content, or send and receive cookies. But PHP can do much more.

There are three main areas where PHP scripts are used.

  • Server-side scripting. This is the most traditional and main target field for PHP. You need three things to make this work. The PHP parser (CGI or server module), a web server and a web browser. You need to run the web server, with a connected PHP installation. You can access the PHP program output with a web browser, viewing the PHP page through the server. All these can run on your home machine if you are just experimenting with PHP programming. See the installation instructions section for more information.
  • Command line scripting. You can make a PHP script to run it without any server or browser. You only need the PHP parser to use it this way. This type of usage is ideal for scripts regularly executed using cron (on *nix or Linux) or Task Scheduler (on Windows). These scripts can also be used for simple text processing tasks. See the section about Command line usage of PHP for more information.
  • Writing desktop applications. PHP is probably not the very best language to create a desktop application with a graphical user interface, but if you know PHP very well, and would like to use some advanced PHP features in your client-side applications you can also use PHP-GTK to write such programs. You also have the ability to write cross-platform applications this way. PHP-GTK is an extension to PHP, not available in the main distribution. If you are interested in PHP-GTK, visit » its own website.


PHP can be used on all major operating systems, including Linux, many Unix variants (including HP-UX, Solaris and OpenBSD), Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, RISC OS, and probably others. PHP has also support for most of the web servers today. This includes Apache, IIS, and many others. And this includes any web server that can utilize the FastCGI PHP binary, like lighttpd and nginx. PHP works as either a module, or as a CGI processor.

So with PHP, you have the freedom of choosing an operating system and a web server. Furthermore, you also have the choice of using procedural programming or object oriented programming (OOP), or a mixture of them both.

With PHP you are not limited to output HTML. PHP's abilities includes outputting images, PDF files and even Flash movies (using libswf and Ming) generated on the fly. You can also output easily any text, such as XHTML and any other XML file. PHP can autogenerate these files, and save them in the file system, instead of printing it out, forming a server-side cache for your dynamic content.

One of the strongest and most significant features in PHP is its support for a wide range of databases. Writing a database-enabled web page is incredibly simple using one of the database specific extensions (e.g., for mysql), or using an abstraction layer like PDO, or connect to any database supporting the Open Database Connection standard via the ODBC extension. Other databases may utilize cURL or sockets, like CouchDB.

PHP also has support for talking to other services using protocols such as LDAP, IMAP, SNMP, NNTP, POP3, HTTP, COM (on Windows) and countless others. You can also open raw network sockets and interact using any other protocol. PHP has support for the WDDX complex data exchange between virtually all Web programming languages. Talking about interconnection, PHP has support for instantiation of Java objects and using them transparently as PHP objects.

PHP has useful text processing features, which includes the Perl compatible regular expressions (PCRE), and many extensions and tools to parse and access XML documents. PHP standardizes all of the XML extensions on the solid base of libxml2, and extends the feature set adding SimpleXML, XMLReader and XMLWriter support.

And many other interesting extensions exist, which are categorized both alphabetically and by category. And there are additional PECL extensions that may or may not be documented within the PHP manual itself, like » XDebug.

As you can see this page is not enough to list all the features and benefits PHP can offer. Read on in the sections about installing PHP, and see the function reference part for explanation of the extensions mentioned here.


Source : php.net
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What is PHP?


PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML.

Nice, but what does that mean? An example:

Example #1 An introductory example
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Example</title>
    </head>
    <body>

        <?php
            
echo "Hi, I'm a PHP script!";
        
?>
    </body>
</html>
Instead of lots of commands to output HTML (as seen in C or Perl), PHP pages contain HTML with embedded code that does "something" (in this case, output "Hi, I'm a PHP script!"). The PHP code is enclosed in special start and end processing instructions <?php and ?> that allow you to jump into and out of "PHP mode."

What distinguishes PHP from something like client-side JavaScript is that the code is executed on the server, generating HTML which is then sent to the client. The client would receive the results of running that script, but would not know what the underlying code was. You can even configure your web server to process all your HTML files with PHP, and then there's really no way that users can tell what you have up your sleeve.

The best things in using PHP are that it is extremely simple for a newcomer, but offers many advanced features for a professional programmer. Don't be afraid reading the long list of PHP's features. You can jump in, in a short time, and start writing simple scripts in a few hours.

Although PHP's development is focused on server-side scripting, you can do much more with it. Read on, and see more in the What can PHP do? section, or go right to the introductory tutorial if you are only interested in web programming.


Source : http://php.net/
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